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Living With Facial Pain

Status Report on Role of Stimulants In Chronic Pain Management

#1

Why isn’t this medicine at least being tried for people with TN?

#2

That is an excellent question, KilleR, and this is a really good article. I read it with great interest.

Have you had any doctors who have tried stimulants such as those mentioned in the article along with your usual pain meds? I wonder whether many other members have tried it.

Admin Seenie (ModSupport)

#3

For decades caffeine, a well known, common place stimulant, has been prescribed for migraine pain. Migraines are now thought to have connections to TN and ATN.

Oliver Sachs mentioned it in his book “Migraine” published in 1970 (written in 1967). He refers to it has a standard home remedy that had been used successfully for countless decades prior to his book. It has been used so long in the treatment of migraines that it’s hard to trace the origins.

Caffeine is also well known to help metabolize medications, specifically pain medication. Often pain medications are reported to work faster/better when taken with tea or coffee (or in my case, Diet Mt Dew).

In our modern world I think we fail to see caffeine as the drug it actually is, it is, after all, a mood enhancer and stimulant that alters one’s perception. But we use it so routinely it’s not taken seriously right now and it’s certainly not viewed as a drug. Which is something that makes the article rather ironic. Instead of taking a dose of a stimulate medication, try a strong cup of coffee or two and see what happens.

I, personally, take all my medications with a caffeine-heavy beverage and ramp up my consumption of caffeine when dealing with both migraine and facial pain. I think it helps.

#4

Azurelle, I might make a suggestion that you re-evaluate your consumption of diet mountain dew. I was a diet coke-aholic myself so believe me I know what you would be giving up when I am suggesting this. Aspartame is made up of 40% aspartic acid, which acts on glutamate receptors and could be a contributing factor to headache disorders and neuropathic pain conditions such as TN. I certainly noticed after giving it up that I have a huge flair if I drink diet coke now so I have given it up completely. I also watched a video of Dr. Kenneth Casey mention the same thing about artificial sweeteners. Just some food for thought if you will.

Best,

Trout

#5

Thanks, Trout. Yeah, I’m well aware of the potential trigger with artificial sweeteners and did a purge and test years ago for it, discovering which ones I can and can’t have. The one in Dt Mt Dew I can have, other ones create huge problems for me. Thanks for the reminder and very solid suggestion! I hope others consider your thoughtful words and try a purge test as well. It does make a difference.

#6

There’s actually a pretty good movie about this little tidbit of information, though I can’t recall the title. I believe it is aspartame which is made from the excrement or feces of the E-coli bacteria - yum! And I’m not sure about Splenda but I thought the little ‘add this little fairy dust to water and voila!’ was the best stuff since sliced bread. I bet I drank a gallon that first day - which was also the last day, make that the only day I was concerned I might hit my head on the bathroom ceiling! It took months before I could see that yellow box and not have my stomach flip!

And when it comes to diet anything, actually anything diet or not, the question is always and always is ‘cui bono?’ The best path to the answer is to follow the money. How many skinny people have you seen drinking or eating ‘diet’ products? There is now, diet or ‘fat free’ cream cheese… I can not help but wonder! What is cream? What is cheese? The answer to both of those questions technically, is ‘fat’. So what the Hell is wrapped in that foil package because it can not possibly be cream cheese. lol

#7

Regular coffee triggers my tn2 type burning pain because it is acidic. I can only drink cold brew without a negative reaction.

#8

Hi Azurelle,
On this I have share my personal experience…
After having afternoon headaches for years. All I had to do is stop drinking Diet sodas. Literally it went away in a matter of one week. Haven’t touched them since.
Si

#9

I just had a very bad reaction to xylitol. I got Biotene lozenges for dry mouth. First one caused dizziness and lower gi upset. Next day I took one one had dizziness, weird headache and severe nausea. I knew better but convinced myself it would be ok. I should all artificial sweeteners.

#10

Probably not used because it is highly addictive and dangerous to stop suddenly. Almost everyone feels good performs better, has better concentration, less appetite on speed. At first. Causes increase heart rate, blood pressure, agitation, excess weight loss, thought
problems and dependence.

#11

According to Dr. Carl Hart Department Head Psychology and Psychiatry Columbia University as well as US Air Force, amphetamines improve cognitive function when properly managed. Further, Dr. Richard C. Senelick M.D. in his book ‘Living with Stroke: A Guide for Patients and Their Families, 5th Edition’, refers to stimulant medication as "very important treatment both in the early and later phases of stroke rehabilitation. According to experimental evidence, animals treated with amphetamines immediately after their stroke recovery to a higher functional level. In other words, stimulants may either have a protective effect on brain cells or assist in their recovery after a stroke. This is still far from common practice in most acute care hospitals, but that can change as more research shows the effectiveness of these medications.”

#12

Another study I found really interesting though I can’t cite right now, strongly indicated that amphetamines when used in pain management were much less likely to be abused. Interesting, huh?

#13

Since it’s well documented that those in actual physical pain do not become addicted (I wanna to say less than one half of one percent) it makes sense that other meds would work as well with little to no addiction.

#14

GOTO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=knCMZElY1AI

Craig Ferguson defines how a narcotic (percocet) used for real pain, doesn’t make one high. And he is a recovering addict.