Has any one had cyberknife surgery for TN?

I am in the process of being evaluated for it but I am concerned about facial numbness.

Cyberknife seems to have a rather mixed record of patient outcomes when used to treat TN. Like Gamma Knife, it delivers a substantial amount of radiation energy into a limited target zone. However, by comparison to Gamma Knife, the target zone is less precise, with from four to six times as much energy being delivered to areas outside the intended 1-2 mm circle. Likewise, be aware that the initial success statistics and length of persistent positive effects with both of these types of surgery is less than that of MVD. I personally believe that the term "non-invasive" should not be applied to either of these procedures, as they are known to leave many patients with significant lesioning and adhesions of exposed nerves to nearby tissue. They are "non-invasive" only in the sense that they do not involve an opening in the skull. And both procedures have a record of complicating any follow-0n surgery by means of MVD.

If you would like to read the 2009 publication of the practice standards of the International Radio Surgery Association, you can message me here or send a note via private email to ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■.

Regards,

R.A. "Red" Lawhern, Ph.D.

Resident Research Analyst, LwTN

thank you so much

I don't know where to post this but I just want to say thanks for the heartfelt welcome by members. It is a relief to have a place to share experiences and concerns.

Unless someone has experienced TN, he or she cannot comprehend your pain.

yes, I would like to read the publication.

Richard A. “Red” Lawhern said:

Cyberknife seems to have a rather mixed record of patient outcomes when used to treat TN. Like Gamma Knife, it delivers a substantial amount of radiation energy into a limited target zone. However, by comparison to Gamma Knife, the target zone is less precise, with from four to six times as much energy being delivered to areas outside the intended 1-2 mm circle. Likewise, be aware that the initial success statistics and length of persistent positive effects with both of these types of surgery is less than that of MVD. I personally believe that the term "non-invasive" should not be applied to either of these procedures, as they are known to leave many patients with significant lesioning and adhesions of exposed nerves to nearby tissue. They are "non-invasive" only in the sense that they do not involve an opening in the skull. And both procedures have a record of complicating any follow-0n surgery by means of MVD.

If you would like to read the 2009 publication of the practice standards of the International Radio Surgery Association, you can message me here or send a note via private email to ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■.

Regards,

R.A. "Red" Lawhern, Ph.D.

Resident Research Analyst, LwTN

And you should be concerned. I was not, and I had no pain for a year, but a year later I developed numbness. That is the term used but the feeling is awful and affects both my eye and inside of my mouth.