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Living With Facial Pain

Does your country have an opioid crisis?


#42

“Best stone experience ever…” I love that! Like it’s a form of relaxing meditation! But I know what you mean. I could see opiates being a problem for kidney stone excretion. It does slow everything down, notably your bowels (very constipating) so I imagine it could relax all the necessary muscles and urinary excretion too and thus make everything lazy and slow when it came to expelling kidney stones. No matter how ‘meditative’ it is, I can’t imagine anyone would want the process being protracted!

Ironic that Co-codamol was the only drug that eased my gallbladder pain but after I had my gallbladder out I couldn’t use it at all. It caused painful Sphincter of Oddi spasms just like, irony of ironies, gallbladder attacks. Maybe there’s a clue in that. Maybe it was helping to move bile duct stones along, or the opposite, relaxing the ‘peristalsis’ (not sure what that would be called!) that causes the terrible contractions. Either way, I miss it. It was always the only effective drug I could use for migraines - if I caught them early enough.


#43

I don’t hear a lot about training doctors on how to properly prescribe opiates. I guess what I mean is that they can’t keep giving patients opiates for long periods of a time and then stop the medication all at once. I hardly hear of doctors weening their patients off of the opiates. I had a full hysterectomy and was prescribed oxycodone for the pain for about 3 weeks. After the 3 weeks, I was still in a lot of pain because of the extensive scar tissue they had to remove from all of my organs that they found during the surgery. My point is, after the 3 weeks, the doctor just stopped the prescription. He did not ween me off the medication or ask if I felt I needed to be weened off. I was lucky because it really didn’t cause much withdrawal symptoms, but I can see how people are struggling and become addicted because many doctors do not help the patients properly come off the medication, or ask if they need to be weened off. These patients then are addicted and do not want to tell their doctor they are feeling the withdrawal symptoms because of all of the stigmatism around the opiates. The doctors really should help the patients after they are finished needing the medication.


#44

can anyone help me i am being witch hunted at moment… here is my post … bEING REFERED TO ANOTHER PAIN MANAGEMENT AND TOLD THEY DONT PRESCRIBE OPIATES click link link for my latest post


#45

Good for your doctor! In the US the opioid crisis is confused by reporting overdose deaths of people who didn’t know their heroin was laced with fentanyl. Fentanyl kills, duh. This is completely different animal than doctors who help their patients that write prescriptions to help their patients cope with chronic pain. The usual dose of media blunders is the crisis.